Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Administration’

Prereq/provisioning script being updated to include Skype for Business Server 2019

March 27th, 2018 No comments

The biggest and most popular public script I’ve ever done is Set-CsFeatures.ps1. It performs tasks such as installation and configuration of all prerequisites for any desired Lync Server 2013/Skype for Business 2015 role, as well as many post installation tasks such as installation of many tools, and configuration of many parameters. What started out as a script to make MY life easier (as are most of my scripts), I’m glad to see the adoption by others. I’m ecstatic that enough people have reported their success and details to say that literally millions of seats have been deployed with this script.

As you can imagine, it’s a substantial effort, with the latest version weighing in at around 8000 lines of PowerShell code. And it’s constantly evolving to include more than 100 options, such as the latest version of tools and applications, features requests, and bug fixes, as the changelog clearly indicates. It’s also tweaked as my own development skills evolve. It’s a true labor of love, and I’m very grateful for all of the feedback, both good and bad. Please, keep it coming! With that being said, I’m happy to report that I’m already well into adding support for Skype for Business Server 2019.

For those of you who are fortunate enough to be involved in TAP/MVP/Elite groups that give you access to the bits, I’m hoping that you’ll use this script in your labs and provide any feedback (my email address is in the header of every script I release). For everyone else, don’t expect a lot of details about things with regards to Skype for Business Server 2019 other than what’s public. TAP/MVP/Elite groups are under strict NDAs. The changes I’m adding to Set-CsFeatures.ps1 don’t reveal anything that hasn’t been announced previously.

For those who continue to use the script to deploy Skype for Business 2015, again, please continue to provide feedback. While I can’t always accommodate every request, I do what I can to implement them. And I’m extremely grateful for bug reports. Seriously. I can’t test every possible scenario, so I’m glad that you take the time to send me info so I can correct it.

Donations

I’ve never been one to really solicit donations for my work. My offerings are created because *I* need to solve a problem, and once I do, it makes sense to offer the results of my work to the public. I mean, let’s face it: I can’t be the only one with that particular issue, right? Quite often, to my surprise, I’m asked why I don’t have a “donate” button so people can donate a few bucks. I’ve never really put much thought into it. But those inquiries are coming more often now, so I’m yielding to them. If you’d like to donate, you can send a few bucks via PayPal at https://www.paypal.me/PatRichard. Money collected from that will go to the costs of my website (hosting and domain names), as well as to my home lab.

Function: Get-CsMaliciousCalls – Retrieve Records for User Reported Malicious Calls in Skype for Business

January 25th, 2018 No comments

Description

A little known feature in Skype for Business is the ability for a user to report a malicious call that they’ve received. This can be done by going to Settings>Tools>Report a Call…, as shown below.

At that point, the user is presented a dialog that allows them to report the just completed call:

If you don’t see the ‘Report a Call…’ option in your client, ensure that the option is enabled in the appropriate voice policy. It can be enabled by setting EnableMaliciousCallTracing to $true, such as

Set-CsVoicePolicy -Identity Global -EnableMaliciousCallTracing $true

Clients will pick up that setting at the next policy refresh.

When the call is reported, info is inserted into the ErrorReportView table of the LcsCDR database. However, unless you’re querying for it, you don’t see it, and many don’t even know where it is, or that it’s even there. It doesn’t do much good if your users are reporting the calls, but you have no way to view the data.

There are a couple of ways you can retrieve the data. The first is some custom reports in your Monitoring Server’s reports. Next is a simple SQL query in SQL Server Management Studio against the LcsCDR database for records with a diagnostics ID of 51017. Just use the following:

SELECT * FROM [LcsCDR].[dbo].[ErrorReportView] WHERE [MsDiagId] = '51017'

The last option is to use PowerShell to make the query against the SQL server for the same info. SQL queries in PowerShell are nothing new. They’re relatively fast, and you end up with an array that can be handled like any other object in PowerShell. If you’re using the default instance of SQL server for the LcsCDR database, use the function like this:

Get-CsMaliciousCalls -Server [server name]

If you’re using a named instance, you can just add the instance name to the command, such as this:

Get-CsMaliciousCalls -Server [server name] -Instance [instance name]

As you can see from the screenshot below, the function will return objects with plenty of info. Note that the FromUri field is the user reporting the malicious call (callee), and the ToUri is the caller. We see the MsDiagHeader notes the reason as “Call Identified as malicious by user”.

Obviously, what you do with the information is up to you. You could use PowerShell to further filter the ToUri into an e.164 number and use that to block numbers at your gateways. Or, use an MSPL script on the front end/mediation servers to drop calls with that number. Quite a few possibilities. If you come up with more ways to use the data, drop me a line or post a comment below. For now, toss the function in your PowerShell profile and enjoy your new data view.

Download

This script is available in my GitHub repo at https://github.com/patrichard/Get-CsMaliciousCalls. Feel free to grab it from there, and contribute any updates or improvements.

Function: Get-CsPhoneNumberAssignment – Find Where a Number is Assigned in Skype for Business

January 22nd, 2018 No comments

Description

One of the problems that can be truly maddening when troubleshooting issues is a 485 ‘ambiguous’ error in Snooper. This is when Skype for Business doesn’t know what to do with an inbound call because the number being called is configured in more than one place. Skype for Business will complain if you try to configure a number more that once in SOME areas, such as several users, but not in all areas. So you’re left with hunting around for a while to figure out where else the number is defined. Meanwhile, users are complaining that calls aren’t working. So I came up with a quick function that will look through all of the areas that a number can be defined, and will list all matches. Additionally, you can use the script to verify that a number is NOT assigned somewhere before assigning it to a resource.

Yes, I know that others have done similar things, notably Tom Arbuthnot’s Get-LyncNumberAssignment :Find #Lync Users/Objects by Phone Number/LineURI #PowerShell and Amanda Debler’s Is that Skype for Business (Lync) Number Free?, as well as other phone number management solutions such as those by Stale Hansen and Lasse Nordvik Wedø. I’ve had a previous version of my script in my profile for a long time and decided to clean it up and make it available.

Is that Skype for Business (Lync) Number Free?

This PowerShell function will look for a full or partial number to see where it is allocated. It looks at the following:

  • User LineUri
  • User PrivateLine
  • Meeting Room LineUri
  • Meeting Room PrivateLine
  • Analog Devices
  • Common Area Phones
  • Unified Messaging (UM) Contacts
  • Dial-In Conferencing Access Numbers
  • Trusted Application Numbers
  • Response Group Numbers

The function accepts input via the named LineUri parameter, or via pipeline. It returns a typical PowerShell object. Here is an example of specifying a full e.164 number.

Get-CsPhoneNumberAssignment -LineUri 12145551212

Example: Specifying a full e.164 number results in a single match. In this case, a user. Click image for larger view.

Specifying a partial number will likely show more matches.

Get-CsPhoneNumberAssignment -LineUri 1214

Example: Specifying a partial number results in several matches. In this case, some users and a dial-in access number. Click image for larger view.

Note that since it must look at all of the related objects in order to build the object, it can take a minute or so to complete. But at least now there is a single command you can run to look in all areas.

Download

This script is available in my GitHub repo at https://github.com/patrichard/Get-CsPhoneNumberAssignment. Feel free to grab it from there, and contribute any updates or improvements.

Function: Remove-IisLogFile – Purging Old IIS Log Files with PowerShell

November 21st, 2016 No comments

PowerShell-logo-128x84If you’re not careful, your server running IIS can create a LOT of logs. The default location for logs is in a sub-folder for the specific web site in c:\inetpub\logs\logfiles\. You can imagine the problems that will happen when your OS drive fills up with logs… things tend to not go so well, and the phone starts to ring. We can’t really just disable logging, as log files are an invaluable resource used in troubleshooting, planning, and maintenance.

Ryan over at Ryadel wrote a great article on adjusting the logging for IIS to be a little more helpful, and to minimize bloat. But we still need to watch for the accumulation of logs and the disk space they take. Ryan includes a two-line method of cleaning up the files in a single IIS site. But some servers, such as Lync and Skype for Business front end servers, have multiple web sites defined. I’ve taken Ryan’s method a bit further by incorporating an idea presented in a Stack Overflow thread, tweaked it a bit, and now we have some code that will clean up all log files that are older than 180 days for all websites on a server. Obviously, that time frame can be adjusted. Here it is the simple method:

Import-Module WebAdministration
$start = (Get-Date).AddDays(-180) 
foreach($WebSite in $(Get-WebSite)) {
  $logFile = "$($Website.logFile.directory)\w3svc$($website.id)".replace("%SystemDrive%",$env:SystemDrive)
  if (Test-Path $logfile){
    Get-ChildItem -Path "$logFile\*.log" | Where-Object {$PSItem.LastWriteTime -lt $start} | Remove-Item -Force
    # Write-Output "$($WebSite.name) [$logfile]"
  }
}

By adjusting the number at the end of the second line, we tailor the maximum age of the logs. In the above example, we’re keeping 180 days of them. We could put that code into a script and call it with a scheduled task to automate the cleanup, essentially creating a self-cleaning server. We can also wrap that code into a function and toss it into the PowerShell profile on the web server, allowing us to run it whenever we need to:

function Remove-IisLogFile{
    [CmdletBinding()]
    param(
        [Parameter(ValueFromPipeline, ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName)]
        [int] $age = 180
    )
    Import-Module WebAdministration
    $start = (Get-Date).AddDays(-$age) 
    foreach($WebSite in $(Get-WebSite)) {
      $logFile = "$($Website.logFile.directory)\w3svc$($website.id)".replace("%SystemDrive%",$env:SystemDrive)
      if (Test-Path $logfile){
        Get-ChildItem -Path "$logFile\*.log" | Where-Object {$PSItem.LastWriteTime -lt $start} | Remove-Item
        # Get-ChildItem -Path "$logFile\*.log" | Where-Object {$PSItem.LastWriteTime -lt $start}
        Write-host "$($WebSite.name) [$logfile]"
      }
    }
}

Then we can call it, optionally specifying the age of the log files we want to purge using the -age parameter. I incorporate the Test-Path code to ensure we’re not throwing an error for a website that is stopped and has never run. This is often the case in the aforementioned Lync/Skype for Business servers, where the default web site is disabled.

As you can see, PowerShell can be great at making sure your servers don’t get packed full of log files, while still maintaining enough logs to be helpful.

Donations

I’ve never been one to really solicit donations for my work. My offerings are created because *I* need to solve a problem, and once I do, it makes sense to offer the results of my work to the public. I mean, let’s face it: I can’t be the only one with that particular issue, right? Quite often, to my surprise, I’m asked why I don’t have a “donate” button so people can donate a few bucks. I’ve never really put much thought into it. But those inquiries are coming more often now, so I’m yielding to them. If you’d like to donate, you can send a few bucks via PayPal at https://www.paypal.me/PatRichard. Money collected from that will go to the costs of my website (hosting and domain names), as well as to my home lab.

Script: Set-CsFeatures.ps1 – Easily Install Prerequisites and Tools for Lync Server 2013 and Skype for Business Server 2015/2019

October 24th, 2016 44 comments

Skype for Business PowerShell logoDescription

Installing Skype for Business and Lync servers is usually boring if you’re a consultant who does it often. Making sure the server specs are right, installing OS features, configuring NICs, etc. It’s even more boring if you’re building a bunch of servers at one time. There’s always a chance for human error, too. So why not automate as much as possible? That’s what I was after when I built the Lync Server 2010 prereq script, then the Lync Server 2013 prereq script. And it’s certainly what I’m after for Skype for Business Server 2015 and 2019. This time, however, I opted to not have a separate script for Skype for Business. Many of the requirements are the same, or just slightly different, than Lync Server 2013. So I just added the Skype for Business functionality to the 2013 script, and updated everything as a whole.

When calling the script, one only needs to specify the –Skype4b switch to put the script into “Skype for Business 2015 mode” or -Skype4b2019 for “Skype for Business 2019 mode”. Not specifying that switch cause a pop-up to appear, asking what mode you’d like. The menus don’t change based on what mode the script is in. Options for only one platform are clearly noted. Otherwise, the options automatically adjust for the platform you’ve chosen. The menu starts out with core prerequisite options for common Lync/SfB roles, followed by Microsoft tools and resources, some third-party tools and options, and then some sub-menus. Sub-menus are broken down by Misc server config, Desktop shortcuts, Taskbar shortcuts, Downloads, Security options, and Misc reports. As you can see, there are TONS of options. I’m not going to list every menu and option here, as the nature of the script means I’ll be adding/updating things as people request them, or as vendors update/alter their offerings. Just note that the options from the 2013 script have been moved around a little bit as I try to keep things organized.

This version also uses my new method of checking for updates, as mentioned in Function: Get-UpdateInfo – Making It Easy for Your Users to Get the Latest Version of Your Scripts. When a new version is available, you’ll get a pop-up notifying you.

If you’re aware of a third-party product, or even Microsoft product, that is a good match for Skype for Business servers, let me know. I’m happy to take a look and see if it would make a good addition to the script. This script has more than 100 options for prereqs, post install config, third party tools, and reports.

Super big thanks to my beta testers for supplying bug reports, suggestions, and comments.

Syntax

C:\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 [-TargetFolder <String>] [-WindowsSource <String>] [-SQLPath <String>] [-InitialMenuOption <Int32>] [-IncludeSSMS ] [-IncludeTelnet ] [-IncludeFW ] [-IncludeHighPower ] [-IncludeStandard ] [-GetInfoFromRegistry ] [-OWASOveride ] [-DownloadOnly ] [-SkipCoreCheck ] [-Tail ] [-Skype4b ] [-Skype4b2019 ] [-SkipUpdateCheck ] [-DisableAutoUpdates ] [-IncludeLanguagePack ] [-SkipEdgeNicConfig ] [-DisableWac] [-WhatIf ] [-Confirm ] [-IncludeTotalCount ] [-Skip <UInt64>] [-First <UInt64>] [<CommonParameters>]

C:\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 [-TargetFolder <String>] [-GetInfoFromRegistry ] [-DownloadAll ] [-SkipCoreCheck ] [-Tail ] [-Skype4b ] [-Skype4b2019 ] [-WhatIf ] [-Confirm ] [-IncludeTotalCount ] [-Skip <UInt64>] [-First <UInt64>] [<CommonParameters>]

C:\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 [-GetInfoFromRegistry ] [-ClearRunningStatus ] [-WhatIf ] [-Confirm ] [-IncludeTotalCount ] [-Skip <UInt64>] [-First <UInt64>] [<CommonParameters>]

C:\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 [-GetInfoFromRegistry ] [-Skype4b ] [-Skype4b2019 ] [-WhatIf ] [-Confirm ] [-IncludeTotalCount ] [-Skip <UInt64>] [-First <UInt64>] [<CommonParameters>]

Examples

.\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 -Skype4b2019

Runs script in Skype for Business Server 2019 mode. Options chosen while running in this mode are tailored to Skype for Business Server 2019. Not specifying this option will cause a pop-up prompt when the script starts, allowing a user to choose the desired mode.

.\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 -Skype4b

Runs script in Skype for Business Server 2015 mode. Options chosen while running in this mode are tailored to Skype for Business Server 2015. Not specifying this option will cause a pop-up prompt when the script starts, allowing a user to choose the desired mode.

.\Set-CsFeatures.ps1

Runs script with default values. The script will prompt for which platform (Lync Server 2013/Skype for Business Server 2015/Skype for Business Server 2019) is being installed.

.\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 -WindowsSource "d:"

Runs script with the location defined for the Windows Server installation files.

.\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 -SQLPath "d:\sqlexpress"

Runs the script and installs any required SQL Express instances in the specified location.

.\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 -TargetFolder "d:\installbits"

Runs the script, and saves any downloaded files and written logs in the specified location instead of the default “c:\_install”.

.\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 -InitialMenuOption 3

Runs the script, and automatically starts option 3 (Front End server). Once it’s finished with that option, the script functions as normal, and displays the menu. NOTE: only options from the main menu can be specified. Options in sub-menus are not available with -InitialMenuOption.

.\Set-CsFeatures.ps1 -tail

Runs script with default values, but also shows an additional PowerShell window showing a live running log file, similar to a Unix tail function. Please note that running this option may result in some popup alerts or prompts being behind the log (tail) window.

Parameters

-TargetFolder

Defines the location for any downloaded files. Defaults to “c:\_install”. Additionally, log files generated by this script are located in a sub-folder of TargetFolder called “logs”. TargetFolder does not support paths with spaces, but does support non-hidden UNC paths.

-WindowsSource

Defines the location of the Windows Server installation files. This is needed to install .Net 3.5 since those files are not installed on the server by default. Defaults to first detected CD-ROM/DVD drive. This can be a local file path, path to an .ISO file, or a non-hidden UNC path.

-SQLPath

Defines the desired installation path for SQL Express. Defaults to “c:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server”.

-InitialMenuOption

Allows you to start the script with the option you want, without first displaying the menu.

-IncludeSSMS

If specified, will include SQL Server Management Studio automatically when prerequisites are installed for any server that has SQL Express instances. If not specified, a prompt will appear.

-IncludeTelnet

If specified, will include Telnet automatically when prerequisites for Front End servers, Director servers, Mediation servers, Edge servers, and/or Persistent Chat servers are installed. If not specified, a prompt will appear.

-IncludeFW

If specified, will include the firewall rules for Get-CsConnections automatically when prerequisites for Front End servers are installed. If not specified, a prompt will appear.

-IncludeHighPower

If specified, tells the script to automatically set the Power Config on the server to High Power. This is instead of the script prompting. This option is available for all server roles.

-IncludeOnlineAdminTools

If specified, tells the script to automatically include the Skype for Business Online admin tools when installing prerequisites for front-end servers.

-IncludeStandard

If specified, tells the script to include the extra SQL Express instance required for Standard Edition front end servers. This is instead of the script prompting.

-GetInfoFromRegistry

This value is only used during mid-prereq reboots. It is automatically set and read by the script, and should never be manually specified.

-DownloadOnly

Tells this script to not install or configure anything – just download the files. This is useful if you’re going to be building servers that do not have Internet access and want to fetch the files beforehand. The big difference between this option and -DownloadAll, is that this option presents the normal menus, and allows you to download files for the options you pick. The -DownloadAll option downloads ALL files needed for ALL options.

-DownloadAll

Tells this script to not install or configure anything – just download ALL of the files. This is useful if you’re going to be building servers that do not have Internet access and want to fetch the files beforehand from a desktop computer. The big difference between this option and -DownloadOnly, is that this option downloads ALL files needed for ALL options, whereas -DownloadOnly allows a user to download files for specific options they choose.

-ClearRunningStatus

This switch forces the running status to be reset. This option should ONLY be used if the script exits/aborts dirty, and attempts to run the script again yield a “Script is already running” message.

-SkipCoreCheck

When specified, skips the check for Server Core. It is not meant to be called manually, as it’s used when the script needs to restart after a server reboot.

-Tail

When specified, opens another PowerShell session and tails the log file, similar to *nix. This is really only beneficial during troubleshooting.

-Skype4b

When specified, uses values specific to Skype For Business Server 2015 for prerequisites. If this option or -Skype4b2019 is NOT specified, a pop-up will appear, asking which mode the script should operate in: Lync Server 2013 or Skype for Business Server 2015, or Skype for Business Server 2019.

-Skype4b2019

When specified, uses values specific to Skype For Business Server 2019 for prerequisites. If this option of -Skype4b is NOT specified, a pop-up will appear, asking which mode the script should operate in: Lync Server 2013, Skype for Business Server 2015, or Skype for Business Server 2019.

-SkipUpdateCheck

When specified, skips the check for a newer version of the script. This option is included mainly for when the script reboots the server.

-DisableAutoUpdates

When specified, skips the prompt and automatically disables auto updates for Windows Server. If not specified, a prompt is displayed.

-IncludeLanguagePack

When specified, skips the prompt for the installation of the Office Online Server English language pack. If not specified, a prompt is displayed.

-SkipEdgeNicConfig

When specified, skips the configuration of the NICs on edge servers. This requires that you manually complete those steps.

-SkipAutoStart

When specified, will not automatically restart the script after a required reboot. The ONLY time this should be used is if you need to do something before the script starts again, like manually mounting an ISO file that the script needs.

-DisableWac

When specified, will automatically disable the Windows Action Center prompt when Server Manager is launched on Windows Server 2019. This can be crucial, as installing Windows Admin Center can cause some conflicts with some of the IIS settings for Skype for Business Server 2019. If this is not specified, and the script is running on Windows Server 2019, a prompt will appear.

-DomainSuffix

When specified, is used for the domain suffix configured on edge servers. If not specified, a prompt will appear to enter a domain suffix.

Installation

No installation is necessary.

Execution Policy: Third-party PowerShell scripts may require that the PowerShell Execution Policy be set to either AllSigned, RemoteSigned, or Unrestricted. The default is Restricted, which prevents scripts – even code signed scripts – from running. For more information about setting your Execution Policy, see Using the Set-ExecutionPolicy Cmdlet.

Donations

I’ve never been one to really solicit donations for my work. My offerings are created because *I* need to solve a problem, and once I do, it makes sense to offer the results of my work to the public. I mean, let’s face it: I can’t be the only one with that particular issue, right? Quite often, to my surprise, I’m asked why I don’t have a “donate” button so people can donate a few bucks. I’ve never really put much thought into it. But those inquiries are coming more often now, so I’m yielding to them. If you’d like to donate, you can send a few bucks via PayPal at https://www.paypal.me/PatRichard. Money collected from that will go to the costs of my website (hosting and domain names), as well as to my home lab.

Known Issues

The only issue I’m aware of at the release of the latest version is that pinning shortcuts to the taskbar in Windows Server 2016 doesn’t seem to be working, and doesn’t work at all in Windows Server 2019. If you come across something, please let me know. Contact info is in the header of the script, and the script also has option 96, ‘how to report a bug’ that will tell you what information is critical when reporting a problem (including where the log file is).

Frequently Asked Questions

Question: Does the script support Windows Server 2019?

Answer: Yes – starting with version 5.0, prerequisites for Windows Server 2019 are included for Skype for Business Server 2019.


Question: Does this script support Windows Server 2016?

Answer: Yes – starting with version 4.20, prerequisites for Windows Server 2016 are included.


Question: Why doesn’t this script support Windows Server 2008 R2 and earlier?

Answer: I used to get asked this all the time. There are several reasons. The first is that out of the box, Server 2008 R2 has PowerShell 2.0 installed, and this script is written in PowerShell 3.0. Requiring you to upgrade to PowerShell 3.0 first, before running a script that installs prerequisites, seems counter-intuitive. And converting the script to just use PowerShell 2.0 is taking a step backwards, especially considering that the current version of PowerShell is 5.x.

Next is sheer time. I test changes I make. And then I test them again. And then I choose different options and combinations and test them. Testing on just Server 2012, Server 2012 R2, Server 2016, and Server 2019 is exhausting. Adding Server 2008 R2 would mean even more testing, plus I’d have to add those resources in my already overtaxed test labs. That would slow down my ability to add new features and test fixes.

Third is that Server 2008 R2 is four versions back. Get with the times already!


Question: Can you add feature x?

Answer: I LOVE getting feature requests. Seriously! Best method to suggest features is to send me an email. My email address is in the comment section at the top of every script I publish. Please be detailed in what you’d like to see, as well as any scenarios you’d use the option (so I can try to duplicate testing). This also goes for additional tools, whether Microsoft or third-party.


Question: How do I submit bug reports?

Answer: Email is best. Grab my email address from the comment section at the top of the script. Please be VERY detailed. Please include screen shots if possible, and ALWAYS include the log file. If the script will start, select option 96, “Report a bug/problem with this script”. If you’re not using the latest version of the script, please download it from the Downloads section below and see if you can duplicate the problem before reporting it.


Question: What if my server doesn’t have Internet access?

Answer: Fear not. Download the required files using either the -DownloadOnly or -DownloadAll options from another machine and place them in the TargetFolder, which is c:\_install by default. The script looks to see if the file is available locally before attempting to download. An exception to this is the latest cumulative update, which is always downloaded, since the URL and file name don’t change, even when the version does.


Question: When I run the script again, I get “Script already running”

Answer: This is because the script didn’t exit gracefully previously. Many reasons this can happen, such as rebooting the server while it’s still running. If you’re positive it’s not running anywhere else (including by other users logged into the same server), run the script with the -ClearRunningStatus switch to clear that flag. Then run it as normal.


Question: Is there an option to specify where (i.e. path) all of the various tools are installed?

Answer: No. And not for a lack of trying. Some tools don’t support automated installs with a specified path. And some of those that DO, actually still dump some core files in a “default” location. The more I tried to come up with the solution, the more I realized that it would entail a substantial amount of overhead in the script.


Question: Why does the script report an unsupported version of .NET Framework?

Answer: Because Lync Server 2013 and Skype for Business Server 2015 don’t support the version detected. Once they do, I’ll adjust the script accordingly.


Question: Can I run the script more than once?

Answer: Absolutely. The script was designed to not only support running more than once, but also to be safe if run on a working Lync/Skype for Business server. HOWEVER, I wouldn’t recommend running the script in a different mode (Lync/SfB 2015/Sfb 2019) than what was run previously. That could be problematic.


Question: Why do I get prompted for some things? Can’t I run the script without all of those prompts?

Answer: The prompts are for things that are not explicitly required for the installation of the role you’ve chosen (according to official Microsoft documentation), but are recommended. The telnet client is a perfect example. It’s not required for any role, but I’ve found a lot of people install it to help with functionality testing and troubleshooting. So, optional items involve a prompt. Can you run without the prompts? Yep. Plenty of options when calling the script to accept some optional features. In the example of telnet, -IncludeTelnet will install the telnet client without prompting. For a complete list of command line options, see the parameter section above, or run ‘Get-Help Set-CsFeatures.ps1’


Download

v5.3 – 11-21-2018 – Set-CsFeatures.v5.3.zipCode signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v5.2 – 11-11-2018 – Set-CsFeatures.v5.2.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v5.1 – 10-05-2018 – Set-CsFeatures.v5.1.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v5.0 – 09-17-2018 – Set-CsFeatures.v5.0.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.9 – 08-31-2018 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.9.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.8 – 03-10-2018 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.8.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.7 – 02-23-2018 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.7.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.6 – 01-19-2018 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.6.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.5 – 12-21-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.5.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.4 – 11-12-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.40.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.30 – 10-11-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.30.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.20 – 09-04-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.20.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.10 – 05-15-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.10.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.09 – 05-13-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.09.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.08 – 04-19-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.08.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.07 – 04-14-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.07.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.06 – 02-05-2017 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.06.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.05 – 11-04-2016 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.05.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.04 – 11-02-2016 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.04.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.03 – 11-01-2016 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.03.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.02 – 10-28-2016 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.02.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.01 – 10-25-2016 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.01.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

v4.0 – 10-24-2016 – Set-CsFeatures.v4.0.zip Code signed with Digicert Code Signing certificate

Changelog

See the changelog for information on what’s changed/included in each version.

Writing a Book – A Labor of Love

October 5th, 2016 1 comment

book-coverAny tech types who’ve written tech books can attest to the fact that it’s a LOT of work. And this one was no different. Skype for Business is a very dynamic product, with features being added and updated on a continuing basis. Fortunately, I had the chance to work with some great tech luminaries – people far smarter than me, for Skype for Business Unleashed. That includes Phil Sharp, Rui Maximo, and Alex Lewis. But don’t let the fact that there are four names on the cover fool you. Plenty of others work behind the scenes, including contributing authors, editors, and publisher staff. I can’t possibly name them all, but I would like to point out a few. Stale Hansen stepped up and wrote a killer chapter on the VDI components of Skype for Business, while John Cook handled, what else, the Mac client chapter. Tom Morgan, one of Modality Systems’ ace developers, wrote on Developing Skype for Business Solutions. Former colleagues Tom Arbuthnot and Iain Smith also contributed. Even ‘The Hoff’ himself, Ken Lasko, added some great info. And to keep us all true to the product, Tim Harrington served as the tech editor. Jamie Stark, a beloved Program Manager in the Skype product group at Microsoft, wrote a killer forward.

During the project, several events occurred that seemed to derail the project. The publisher, Pearson, eliminated 4000 staff in a corporate downsizing. This was also around the time that Microsoft Press also underwent a significant restructuring. The project was in doubt for a while, but Pearson came back, committed to getting the book on to the shelves. Our normal full time gigs, family lives, and other interests also came into play. And unfortunately, someone involved in the book suffered a tragic loss. All of these caused the project timeline to slip. And during this time, the product group kept working on the product. Each time a Cumulative Update was released, we would have to review what had already been written to verify it still was valid, including details, screen shots, PowerShell commands, and more.

So why write this book? We certainly aren’t getting rich doing it. In fact, we’d all likely agree that you can’t survive on writing books at this pace. And time spent away from family and friends, and other interests can be tough. But seeing it on the shelf is rewarding on so many levels. It’s great to add the publication to your resume, LinkedIn profile, and more. Name recognition is always nice. But more importantly, getting the knowledge and experience into a format that can be beneficial to others is extremely personally rewarding to me. Is every little tidbit in there? Of course not. The book is 1100 pages. Decisions were made on how much space we could to allocate to each topic. Some chapters could be exponentially larger. But we tried to touch on the important stuff. Enough to get an environment properly designed, build, configured, and administered. And I think we did pretty well in that regard. And of course, as soon as we turned in the final edits, new features were released by the product group.

Books don’t sell unless people know about them. So we don our marketing hats and get on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, blogs, and other online resources and let the world know it’s out there. Modality Systems was generous enough to put together a book signing event at Microsoft Ignite, and gave away some signed copies, as well. Twitter followers even started sending in pictures of where the book had been sighted, including the Microsoft Conference Store, MIT, and more. A signed copy even made its way to Gurdeep Pall‘s desk. Gurdeep is the Corporate Vice President of the Skype business unit at Microsoft, and he tweeted a selfie of himself holding the book. As I write this article, the book is the highest ranked Skype for Business book on Amazon. And that’s no easy task, as the other books were also written by some other top notch nerds like us.

cth_vttw8aij5ka-jpg-large

Book signing event at Microsoft Ignite 2016. From left to right: Stale Hansen, Phil Sharp, me, Rui Maximo, and Tom Morgan.

I again want to thank everyone involved. It would not have been possible without them. I’d also like to thank the entire Product Group, as well as the Skype for Business MVPs. Both of these groups were instrumental in answering questions that popped up throughout this process.

I hope you enjoy the book, and welcome any comments or concerns.

One Liners: Finding Elevated Accounts That Are Enabled For Lync & Skype for Business

November 18th, 2014 No comments

Lync 2013 logo 128x128One thing I see while doing Lync environmental health checks for some customers is some elevated accounts that are enabled for Lync. An example is members of the Domain Admins group. This can be somewhat problematic, especially for administration of those elevated accounts. For security reasons, it is not recommended to enable members of Domain Administrators group for Lync.

You cannot use Lync Server Control Panel to manage users who are members of the Domain Admins Active Directory group. For Domain Admins users, you can use Lync Server Control Panel only to perform read-only search operations. Attempting to perform write operations (such as enable or disable for Lync Server Control Panel, change pool or assigned policies, telephony settings, SIP address) on an elevated user will yield an “Access Denied” error. To perform write operations on a member of Domain Admins, you must use Lync Server Management Shell (PowerShell) cmdlets while logged on as a member of Domain Admins.

For more information please refer to this Microsoft page: User accounts enabled for Lync Server 2013

To query an elevated group, such as Domain Admins, for Lync enabled users, use the following:

(Get-ADGroupMember "Domain Admins").DistinguishedName | Get-CsUser -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | Format-Table DisplayName,SipAddress

You can replace the “Domain Admins” with the name of any group, really. When you run it, you’ll end up with something like:

PS C:\> (Get-ADGroupMember "Domain Admins").DistinguishedName | Get-CsUser -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | Format-Table DisplayName,SipAddress

DisplayName                                                 SipAddress
-----------                                                 ----------
Services                                                    sip:services@contoso.com
Dan Giles                                                   sip:dan.giles@contoso.com
Neil Armstrong                                              sip:neil.armstrong@contoso.com
Dawn Lopes                                                  sip:dawn.lopez@contoso.com
Bob Seger                                                   sip:bob.seger@contoso.com
Gail O'Grady                                                sip:gail.ogrady@contoso.com
Troy Dallas                                                 sip:Troy.Dallas@contoso.com
Steve Carrell                                               sip:steve.carrell@contoso.com

You can Lync disable these users for Lync, using the Disable-CsUser cmdlet. This can be done either individually using the -Identity parameter, or everyone at once by pipeline, with something like:

(Get-ADGroupMember "Domain Admins").DistinguishedName | Disable-CsUser -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

If you have some accounts that were previously members of an elevated group like Domain Admins, but no longer are, then the AdminCount parameter on their account may still be set. This will cause the Access Denied issue to continue. You can manually change this on the user object using ADSIEDIT, or via a script such as Set-AdminUser.

Removing PIC Federation Configuration for AOL and Yahoo!

July 7th, 2014 No comments

In November of 2012, Microsoft announced that Public IM Connectivity (“PIC”) federation for AOL and Yahoo! would be ending. Microsoft gave a good advanced warning, eventually saying it would cease on June 30, 2014. They held true to that date, and connectivity via the traditional methods is no longer available. Some have even reported that Yahoo! federation stopped working as early as April 2014.

I’ve run some reporting using Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1 and verified that other than my occasional conversations with dear old Mom, no one was using these PIC providers. So no big loss, and certainly, no business impact. But, for those orgs that DO require connectivity to AOL, such as some of the hedge fund groups, AOL does have a service that will allow your users to communicate with AOL users. It does. however, require a monthly per user fee. More information can be found at https://aimenterprise.aol.com/microsoft/.

For now, any AOL or Yahoo! contacts that users have in their contacts list will show as Presence Unknown.

It now makes sense to remove the related configuration for your Lync config – if you had it configured previously. PIC federation is configured via Public Providers. We can see the public providers configured via the Get-CsPublicProvider cmdlet, as shown below.

LSMS - before

Removing the configuration for AOL and Yahoo! can be performed with one line of code.

Get-CsPublicProvider | Where-Object {$_.ProxyFQDN -eq "sip.oscar.aol.com" -or $_.ProxyFQDN -eq "lcsap.msg.yahoo.com"} | Remove-CsPublicProvider

This will remove just the AOL and Yahoo! public providers, and leave any others, like Skype, as shown below when running Get-CsPublicProvider again.

LSMS - after

If you’re a little apprehensive about using PowerShell (and you shouldn’t be – embrace the shell!), we can also remove the public providers in the Lync Server Control Panel. Navigate to Federation and External Access>SIP Federated Providers. You’ll see a list of both public and hosted providers as shown below.

LSCP - before

Merely select the appropriate provider you’d like to remove, select Edit>Delete. Once you’ve removed both the AOL and Yahoo! providers, you’re left with any remaining public and hosted providers as shown below.

LSCP - after

Once clients refresh their config, the options for AOL and Yahoo! will no longer be available when adding new contacts.

client

Users wills still need to manually remove AOL and Yahoo! federated contacts from their contacts list, though.

Script: Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1 – See Stats About Conversations With Specific Federated Domains

May 13th, 2014 5 comments

Lync 2013 logo 128x128Description

Richard Schwendiman, PFE at Microsoft, came up with a great SQL query that you could plug into SQL Server Management Studio to see time & date info for conversations with federated or PIC domains. In Richard’s case, he used the aol.com PIC domain. Since PIC federation with AOL and Yahoo is ending next month, I thought this was great timing on Richard’s part. But sometimes, Lync admins can’t login to SQL servers to run queries due to security policy. Plus, the query is something you’d have to keep handy and edit accordingly each time you wanted to get data. So I figured – hey, why not whip up a quick script to allow an admin to query SQL for this data, allowing for any domain and time frame to be specified? Poof – out comes my script.

This script will query a specific SQL server for information about a specific federated SIP domain. The domain does NOT need to be in the allowed domains list if you’re open federating. Any SIP domain name works. You can specify a start date/time in the yyyy-MM-dd format, such as 2014-05-13 using the -TimeSpan parameter. Or, you can use some handy ranges I’ve included, including LastWeek (the last 7 days), Last30Days, Last year (last 365 days), FirstOfYear or ThisYear (since Jan. 1), FirstOfMonth or ThisMonth (since the 1st of the month), FirstOfWeek or ThisWeek (since Sunday). Optionally, you can specify an end date/time in the yyyy-MM-dd format. This script will default to FirstOfYear with no end date, and aol.com for the domain. As we see below, only the SQL server holding the LcsCDR database is queried.

aol3

Now, from this output, we see that there is not a lot of communications with people on AOL since the first of the year. The upcoming change should have very little impact.

If you’re using a named instance in SQL, you can specify it as well.

The script outputs a full object, just like other cmdlets, so you can pipe it to other commands to alter the display, including sorting, or my favorite, Out-GridView, as well as outputting to files such as .csv.

Hopefully, this tool will make life a little easier in digging out data.

Syntax

Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1 [[-SqlServer] ] [[-SqlInstance] ] [[-SipDomain] ] [[-TimeSpan] <object>] [[-EndDate] <object>] [-WhatIf ] [-Confirm ] [<commonparameters>]</commonparameters></object>

Installation

Execution Policy: Third-party PowerShell scripts may require that the PowerShell Execution Policy be set to either AllSigned, RemoteSigned, or Unrestricted. The default is Restricted, which prevents scripts – even code signed scripts – from running. For more information about setting your Execution Policy, see Using the Set-ExecutionPolicy Cmdlet.

Donations

I’ve never been one to really solicit donations for my work. My offerings are created because *I* need to solve a problem, and once I do, it makes sense to offer the results of my work to the public. I mean, let’s face it: I can’t be the only one with that particular issue, right? Quite often, to my surprise, I’m asked why I don’t have a “donate” button so people can donate a few bucks. I’ve never really put much thought into it. But those inquiries are coming more often now, so I’m yielding to them. If you’d like to donate, you can send a few bucks via PayPal at https://www.paypal.me/PatRichard. Money collected from that will go to the costs of my website (hosting and domain names), as well as to my home lab.

Assumptions

None

Download

v1.0 – 05-13-2014 – Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.v1.0.zip

Changelog

See the changelog for information on what’s changed/included in each version.

 

Changelog: Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1

May 13th, 2014 No comments

This is the changelog page for Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1. You will find a complete list of released versions, their dates, and the features and issues addressed in each. Please refer to the script’s main page for more information including download links, installation details, and more.

v1.0 – 05-13-2014

  1. Initial version